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 Post subject: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 1:59 pm 
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Remember we get one track extra from First Blood and Planet of the Apes,Night Crossing Main Title.
That was because of Douglas Fake.
That was big time and Expanded first time.
Douglas Fake invented Expanded and i love him for doing that!


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:23 am 
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He certainly produced more cures for the doldrums than any medical doctor. "Take three Schifrins, two Goldsmiths and a Glass, then call me in the morning."


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:41 pm 
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Recently found the Intrada disc of Planet Of The Apes with an additional track. One of Goldsmith's best and a favorite since I began listening to film music. The 1968 LP is a favorite. The film, score, everything about it is a truly proud moment in American cinema history. And yes, Doug Fake is one of the best of the bunch in a market saturated with hacks out for a quick dollar, he seems like a genuinely decent person. Proud to own a big stack of those Intrada CDs.

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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:03 am 
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He also gives good hugs. :)

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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:39 am 
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I don't know who "invented" expansion, but if I remember correctly, the first truly expanded (over previous releases) soundtrack I bought was Varése Sarabande's THE BLUE MAX , which came out well before Intrada's FIRST BLOOD or PLANET OF THE APES.


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:30 am 
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Nicolai P. Zwar wrote:
I don't know who "invented" expansion, but if I remember correctly, the first truly expanded (over previous releases) soundtrack I bought was Varése Sarabande's THE BLUE MAX , which came out well before Intrada's FIRST BLOOD or PLANET OF THE APES.


Of course, "expanded" is hardly anything unique to soundtracks anyway. Tons of albums of all genres have bonus tracks in re-releases. And Mosaic was doing comprehensive session compilations for jazz since (apparently) 1983, as a for instance.


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:15 pm 
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Ok. You folks are giving me some cool credit for which I humbly offer my thanks. Yes, we were among the early adopters of adding tracks previously not released to existing soundtrack albums when CDs first entered our realm. But the idea certainly goes back further, at least into the LP era of the seventies, and probably earlier. I recall Tony Thomas adding tracks to some albums he had produced, such as his Citadel label version of Goldsmith's A Patch Of Blue. During that seventies decade I also recall MGM in Europe reissuing their legendary 1961 album to El Cid, but now including one previously unreleased track to end side one of the record. And the pioneering John Lasher added previously unreleased tracks to his expanded Spirit Of St. Louis release that same decade. However, adding new tracks from First Blood and Planet Of The Apes to their respective CDs is a credit I'll happily take - for those two scores are indeed masterpieces to this day.

Trivia. I recall getting a license to release the Apes soundtrack on CD, then getting "The Hunt" in unmixed form from Fox's music editor and my friend, Len Engel, preparing a new stereo mix, going over to Jerry's to play the new mix and get his approval - which he gave - and then premiering it so everyone could enjoy it. And it was really so crazy. This was the most famous cue from the movie - the one oft described whenever this movie is mentioned, including by Franklin Schaffner in his several recorded interviews, the riveting cue with the ram's horn when we first see the apes on horseback - and incredibly it had never been released before! So in this case, Intrada did premiere something really important in film music recordings. The fact that Jerry enjoyed hearing the cue again after so many years and was happily involved in the premiere of it for our label makes this memory pretty cool indeed.
--Doug


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:32 am 
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Douglass Fake wrote:
Ok. You folks are giving me some cool credit for which I humbly offer my thanks. Yes, we were among the early adopters of adding tracks previously not released to existing soundtrack albums when CDs first entered our realm. But the idea certainly goes back further, at least into the LP era of the seventies, and probably earlier. I recall Tony Thomas adding tracks to some albums he had produced, such as his Citadel label version of Goldsmith's A Patch Of Blue. During that seventies decade I also recall MGM in Europe reissuing their legendary 1961 album to El Cid, but now including one previously unreleased track to end side one of the record. And the pioneering John Lasher added previously unreleased tracks to his expanded Spirit Of St. Louis release that same decade. However, adding new tracks from First Blood and Planet Of The Apes to their respective CDs is a credit I'll happily take - for those two scores are indeed masterpieces to this day.

Trivia. I recall getting a license to release the Apes soundtrack on CD, then getting "The Hunt" in unmixed form from Fox's music editor and my friend, Len Engel, preparing a new stereo mix, going over to Jerry's to play the new mix and get his approval - which he gave - and then premiering it so everyone could enjoy it. And it was really so crazy. This was the most famous cue from the movie - the one oft described whenever this movie is mentioned, including by Franklin Schaffner in his several recorded interviews, the riveting cue with the ram's horn when we first see the apes on horseback - and incredibly it had never been released before! So in this case, Intrada did premiere something really important in film music recordings. The fact that Jerry enjoyed hearing the cue again after so many years and was happily involved in the premiere of it for our label makes this memory pretty cool indeed.
--Doug


I wonder who innovated the idea of intentionally leaving out a critical cue for the purpose of later selling an expansion. After all, there was a time when these soundtrack albums could sell hundreds of thousands of copies.


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 Post subject: Re: Douglas Fake invented Expanded
PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:17 am 
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Douglass Fake wrote:
Trivia. I recall getting a license to release the Apes soundtrack on CD, then getting "The Hunt" in unmixed form from Fox's music editor and my friend, Len Engel, preparing a new stereo mix, going over to Jerry's to play the new mix and get his approval - which he gave - and then premiering it so everyone could enjoy it. And it was really so crazy. This was the most famous cue from the movie - the one oft described whenever this movie is mentioned, including by Franklin Schaffner in his several recorded interviews, the riveting cue with the ram's horn when we first see the apes on horseback - and incredibly it had never been released before! So in this case, Intrada did premiere something really important in film music recordings. The fact that Jerry enjoyed hearing the cue again after so many years and was happily involved in the premiere of it for our label makes this memory pretty cool indeed.
--Doug



It had always been an absolute mystery to me why of all cues THIS one was not included on the first LP OST release.


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